Top Ten Warnings I Want to See on Books

 

TTT is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

TTT is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

Top Ten Warnings I Want to See on Books

Note: This is not the TTT from The Broke and the Bookish.

Disclaimer: I got the idea from Verbosity Book Reviews. [And if you are reading this, please note that I loved your idea and I wanted to make my own.]

1. WARNING: This book may cause excessive fangirling and rereading. [Specifically for Harry Potter, Percy Jackson, and Divergent, plus maaaaany others.]

2. CAUTION: It cannot be guaranteed that these pages will remain dry. [Specifically for TFIOS; although I only teared up, I know other people drowned in their tears.]

3. WARNING: This book contains deaths of many loved characters. [Specifically for Harry Potter and Divergent.]

4. WARNING: This book is insanely awesome. [There are too many specifics to list.]

5. CAUTION: Fluffy contemporary ahead. Contains romance, friendship, and possible misunderstandings. [To all the pink and fluffy contemporaries of the world.]

6. YOU’VE READ THIS? HA. YOU HAVE NOW BEEN REELED IN. GOOD LUCK. [To the books with crazy fandoms.]

7. WARNING: This series has either one or more unnecessary books. Proceed with caution. [Hello there, Hunger Games!]

8. WARNING: This is how the world may end up. Better read this book now to learn what to do, right? [Specifically to The Lunar Chronicles, Divergent, and Tomorrow Girls.]

9. CAUTION: Amazing, awesome writing ahead. You will never be better at writing than this author. [*cough* J. K. Rowling *cough*]

10. WARNING: Although this book seems short, it is packed with lots of mind-blowing information that is only barely noticed and you will wonder about. Forever. [Specifically for The Giver.]

Did you like this list? Would you add any other warnings? Tell me in the comments below.

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Weekly Wrap-Up #1

I’ve decided to start doing weekly wrap-ups. I will feature what I posted about, and if I saw a post on another blog that I think others should see.

On Sunday, I interviewed Bridgett Spicer. It was fun to learn more about her comic strip and her life! She is a really nice person.

On Monday, I learned the difference between a highlighter and a marker, I talked about my reading of To Kill a Mockingbird and I added a dictionary! [Which you can find here.] I loved learning about highlighters and black light.

On Tuesday, I did a book review of To Kill a Mockingbird, participated in Top Ten Tuesday, and passed 2,250 views. I adored To Kill a Mockingbird.

On Wednesday, I reviewed The Giver. Which I also adored.

On Thursday, I posted Part 1 of My Writing Process, Procrastination, and Perseverance.

Since it’s Friday, poll time!

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Book Review: The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver by Lois Lowry

Title: The Giver

Author: Lois Lowry

Number of Pages: 179

Genre: Science fiction

Overall Rating: 4.5/5 stars

Summary From Cover: Jonas’s world is perfect. Everything is under control. There is no war or fear or pain. There are no choices. Every person is assigned a role in the Community. When Jonas turns twelve, he is singled out to receive special training from The Giver. The Giver alone holds the memories of the true pain and pleasure of life. Now, it is time for Jonas to receive the truth. There is no turning back.

Discussion: Like To Kill a Mockingbird, I had heard such good things about this book, and the movie is coming out, so I had to read it. I actually didn’t know what it was about when I picked it up! I had high expectations for it, from all the feedback I’d gotten, so I was happily satisfied.

The beginning was not slow. In fact, none of it was slow–I was reading as fast as I could because I was so riveted! [Be prepared for me to use even more exclamation marks in this review.] I was hooked throughout the entire book.

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I think you get my point of how excellent it was; let’s move on to the negatives (which there were few).

The language was very…scripted. Which is how, I guess, the society worked. But I do feel like they didn’t use realistic words that people say. Maybe Lowry wanted it to be like that. Who knows?

Also, I couldn’t really connect with their feelings. Even when it was being described, I feel like it was either under-dramatic or melodramatic; there was no in between that most people show. I understand that under certain circumstances there are extremes, but these felt too…I don’t know, just under- or over-dramatic.

Books I found very similar to this is the Matched trilogy by Ally Condie and the Delirium trilogy by Lauren Oliver. Both societies are controlled and somewhat robotic, in my opinion. And they take away creativity.

Overall, I loved The Giver, so please read it! And then go see the movie! But don’t see the movie before the book!

I hope you enjoyed my book review of The Giver. Did you like this book, if you’ve read it? I’m going to the bookstore tomorrow, so I will begin reading then.

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Top Ten Tuesday, Book Review, and An Announcement!

Contrary to the title, I am announcing first. I just passed 2,250 views on my blog! And, yes, I know, many of them are visits from the same person. But it means you care enough to come back! You have faith in me and my writing. So, thank you, to everyone. At least I know you’re there, even if you don’t subscribe or comment. [Take the hint!] Back to the awesomeness.

*Thankyouthankyouthankyouthankyouthankyou*

I love all of you so much! Thank you for reading my posts, for reading my rants, and book reviews, and maybe even stopping by to check out my novel. You are the reason I have over 2,250 views.

TTT is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

TTT is a meme created by The Broke and the Bookish.

Top Ten Fictional Characters I Would Want to Sit At My [Awesome] Lunch Table

1. Hermione Granger Because we are soul mates. Besides Evi, of course. Won’t forget you, bae. :)

2. Leo Valdez He is my OTP. So, um, duh?

3. Annabeth Chase We can talk about how annoying Hera is. ;) And how Seaweed Brain, is well, a seaweed brain.

4. Cinder She is so amazing! Just to have a conversation with her would be like, woah… But then again, all these people are pretty amazing.

5. Sabrina Grimm She has a wicked sense of humor and sarcasm. We both have little sisters.

6. Isabelle Lightwood Her sense of fashion is truly awesome. She is the best stylish, kick-butt girl I know.

7. Simon Lewis I mean, he just might top Leo Valdez. Although, kinda hard to beat Izzy…

8. Augustus Waters Another OTP.

9. Sadie Kane She’s British. An she can give me tips on hair-dyeing!

10. Tris Prior She is just so cool, I mean, come on.

That was my TTT; I loved doing it, by the way. Sorry I didn’t have pictures! I was too lazy.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

Title: To Kill a Mockingbird

Author: Harper Lee

Number of Pages: 324

Overall Rating: 4/5 stars

Summary From Cover: The unforgettable novel of a childhood in a sleepy Southern town and the crisis of conscience that rocked it, To Kill A Mockingbird became both an instant bestseller and a critical success when it was first published in 1960. It went on to win the Pulitzer Prize in 1961 and was later made into an Academy Award-winning film, also a classic.

Compassionate, dramatic, and deeply moving, To Kill A Mockingbird takes readers to the roots of human behavior – to innocence and experience, kindness and cruelty, love and hatred, humor and pathos. [By the way, “pathos” is actually a word. Crazy, right? It means “a quality that evokes pity or sadness.]

Discussion: God, did I love this book. I heard such wonderful things about it from many other bloggers, and when I found it in my homeroom teacher’s classroom, of course I had to pick it up!

The first few chapters were really too slow for me, and I began to think that To Kill a Mockingbird would be my first bad review. The plot moved slowly and many big words were used that I didn’t understand. Finally, though, the plot sped up with Boo Radley and Dill and such, and I was happily entranced.

Boo Radley fascinated me, along with the trinkets in the tree. In fact, the whole town fascinated me. Each member was lovely in some way, but had their hamartia. Maybe their hamartia wasn’t exactly huge, but I loved how none of the residents were peachy perfect.

I enjoyed seeing Scout and Jem mature, growing up past Boo Radley and ghosts and the like. Jem’s stage of being very adult-like reminded me of myself. My sister (think of her as Scout) is always pestering me to play with her, while I don’t want to (think of me as Jem). I sympathized with Jem, and learned more from Scout about this and why my sister gets sad when I don’t play with her.

Although this book is funny and sweet, it also has some huge themes that I thought were snuck in nicely. Lee didn’t make the book a lesson, but she also told the truth.

Sexism actually shows up a lot, and from a feminist’s point of view, I was disappointed with parts of it. Scout is scolded for “acting like a girl,” and then Aunt Alexandra says it isn’t proper for a girl to be wearing pants instead of a skirt. Scout is very sexist, too, but only by listening to her elders and observing those around her.

Racism: the second of two -isms that frequent the pages. The whole second part of the book is about racism. Black people are often referred to as a racist term I cannot repeat, but I bet you can guess. And the whole court trial and the final verdict is about race, and not at all about justice and facts.

I think Scout and Matilda would be best friends. Both are scolded for learning early and are wise beyond their years.

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All in all I adored this book, but think the slow parts were a bit…well, slow. They are the only reason I give To Kill a Mockingbird 4 stars. Read it!

Next, I’m reading The Giver by Lois Lowry, and already I’m more than halfway through.

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